Great querstion from this week’s 10233 design of Exchange 2010 class. Our student asks

“in the past a mailbox move didn’t also move dumpster data. You had to recover it prior to the move. Has this changed in 2010?”

After some digging I was able to confirm that it IS now gathered along with everything else. Confirmed HERE found on the MSexchange.org site. Great article Neil!

 

The move request puts a special system message into the system mailbox on the mailbox database. The Microsoft Exchange Mailbox Replication service checks the contents of the system mailbox on each mailbox database to see if any move requests are waiting and then processes them accordingly. There are many benefits to having the mailbox moves carried out by this service. Here are three main areas that I typically encounter on migration projects that are addressed with move requests:

  • Mailboxes can now be moved online whilst the users are logged into them. Admittedly this is only available if the source mailbox is running Exchange 2007 SP2 or later, or Exchange 2010. However, this is a welcome addition to the overall mailbox moving process as it will help negate the need to move mailboxes out of core business hours.
  • Items in the dumpster are now moved as part of the process. In previous versions of Exchange, moving a mailbox did not move the items in the dumpster and it was therefore required that the user had to recover any deleted items prior to the mailbox move. It was all too easy to forget to inform the users of this fact and in some cases users who had been moved then proceeded to recover items from their dumpster only to find it completely empty.
  • The mailbox contents are no longer processed by the computer running the move process. It was often the case in Exchange 2007 that the Move-Mailbox cmdlet, or associated script, was run on an administrative machine rather than directly on the target Exchange 2007 server. However, in this scenario, the mailbox contents are moved from the source database to the administrative machine and then into the target database. This scenario was mitigated by running the cmdlet or script directly on the target database server. In Exchange 2010 this situation will not be encountered since the mailbox moves are performed by the Microsoft Exchange Mailbox Replication service running on the Client Access Server.